J.K. Rockin' on the tumblrphone

Baroness de Cloudesley-Shovel von Cupboardfingers. Flash by name, flash by nature. Awesome queer-identifying pansexual white middle-class ciswoman hipster Gryffindor. 100% a whatever-I-feel-like blog, all day every day.

Currently blogging about Pacific Rim, The Three Musketeers, Les Miserables, Harry Potter, kittens, naked sexy people, pretty clothes, bunnies, and how I accidentally deleted my blog and hate life.

pilferingapples:

at-heart-a-gentleman:

thereisnoblognameonlyzuul:

At this point I feel like everyone else was like,

"Enjolras, no."

And he was just like, “Enjolras YES.”

      (x)

17000dollars:

mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.
There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.
It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

i only have like 5 bookmarks but for some reason this was one of them

17000dollars:

mmkayn:

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.

There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.

It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

this continues to be the best reply to a criticizing comment on this site

i only have like 5 bookmarks but for some reason this was one of them

erinthesails:

lyriumpomegranates:

angelicdiaspora:

kyrstin:

Ron always just ****ing knows

If you remember, Ron was always weirdly good with Divination. Whenever he’d joke about a possible outcome, it would eventually happen in some roundabout way!

#AU where Ron is actually a great prophet but no one ****ing knows it#and when they find out#Ron is torn between being pissed as **** and thinking it’s hilarious

There’s actually a whole point about this in these Harry Potter analysis books I used to read obsessively. Two of their cardinal rules of HP foreshadowing are “Hermione is always right, except when she’s emotional” and “Ron is always wrong, except when he’s joking”. This actually plays out pretty frequently in the series if you look for it!

erinthesails:

lyriumpomegranates:

angelicdiaspora:

kyrstin:

Ron always just ****ing knows

If you remember, Ron was always weirdly good with Divination. Whenever he’d joke about a possible outcome, it would eventually happen in some roundabout way!

There’s actually a whole point about this in these Harry Potter analysis books I used to read obsessively. Two of their cardinal rules of HP foreshadowing are “Hermione is always right, except when she’s emotional” and “Ron is always wrong, except when he’s joking”. This actually plays out pretty frequently in the series if you look for it!

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Jen Keith recommends Watson & Holmes Vol. 1

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”
-Sherlock Holmes 

Or in this case: when you have eliminated your comic to-read list, whatever remains, however good, it must be Watson and Holmes that you read next.

Modern adaptations of Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, and the steadfast Doctor Watson are in vogue with BBC’s Sherlock and CBS’ Elementary. Karl Bollers and Rick Leonardi, with their own avant garde take, move the now African American pair from England and into Harlem, NYC for investigations into drug trafficking, kidnapping, murder, and more. 

Despite the contemporary setting and subsequent changes to what we expect from a Holmesian story, it’s still entrenched in Doyle’s writing. Many crime dramas turn into procedural cop shows; Watson and Holmes keeps us in Watson’s shoes, observing Holmes’ genius while he himself steps into the spotlight as a force to be reckoned. As a fan of the original work I’m thrilled they maintained that quintessential vantage point while giving Watson the attention he deserves. Nods to the source material are scattered throughout, so fans of any version of Holmes and the uninitiated reader alike will find an engaging mystery for all tastes. 

Leonardi’s art keeps the distinct personalities of the characters and New York City intact. I never realized I was missing a Sherlock Holmes with dreadlocks in my life, but I was. Meanwhile, Mycroft and the Baker Street Irregulars a treat, and I eagerly await more of them. 

You may be familiar with a more traditional interpretation, but I highly recommend you pick up Watson and Holmes Vol. 1 for the collected issues #1 – 5 and a breath of fresh air in these well-loved characters. After all, the game is afoot.

[Read Watson & Holmes Vol. 1 Here!]

For fans of: crime, drama, action

Jen Keith is a Digital Editor at comiXology, comic artist, music addict, and would like you to know that Holmes never said “Elementary, my dear Watson” in the original stories.